To Kill a Mockingbird

In To Kill a Mockingbird lawyer Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck, in an Oscar-winning role) defends an innocent black man against rape charges but ends up in a maelstrom of hate and prejudice. Meanwhile, with help from a friend, Finch’s children, Jem and Scout (Mary Badham), set their sights on making contact with a reclusive neighbor (Robert Duvall). It is a compelling, heartfelt, sentimental (but not saccharine) story of a country lawyer and father in the Depression Era 1930s, who is assigned by the county judge to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. The unique accomplishment of this movie is the focus on the children. It is a story about children making sense of their world, and about a father’s love and guidance. There are additional little nuggets of gold: the film includes the debut of one of our greatest actors, Robert Duvall as Boo — and Dill is based on a young Truman Capote who actually was a childhood friend of the author of this novel. Has there ever been a more effective scene than when at the end of the trial the Black minister turns to Scout and says “Miss Jean Louise, stand up, your father is passing”? Or a better ending? Or a better object lesson about race and class? I don’t think so. The Atticus character could be a national role model. Gregory Peck was nominated for Oscars five times, but this was the only time he took one home. Southern comforts abound in this big-screen adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. Atticus Finch: “He said I could shoot all the blue jays I wanted, if I could hit ’em, but to remember it was a sin to kill a mockingbird…I reckon because mockingbirds don’t do anything but sing for our enjoyment. They don’t eat people’s gardens, don’t nest in the corncribs. They don’t do one thing but just sing their hearts out for us.” What more can be said about this classic? A great novel turned into an even greater film! How often does that happen? Perhaps the best movie adaptation of a novel of all time. It is no wonder why this book continues to be required reading for so many high school kids. It should be required reading for people of all ages. It is entertaining, thought-provoking and is guaranteed to move you. I have never met a person who did not love this film. I’ve never been more affected by a film emotionally than by To Kill a Mockingbird. After 40 years the film has lost none of its power. A rare film that can be viewed over and over with satisfaction. This is a great story that will leave you deep in thought and contemplating your relationships and attitudes about family, community, honesty, violence and race. Sometimes we need to find a “fresh” movie and that can include one that was made years ago. Sometimes we are blown away by a vintage movie that we have never seen or saw only once a long time ago. To Kill a Mockingbird is that movie for me. This beloved film is consistently ranked near the top and ranked #25 among all films by the American Film Institute. As close to perfection as a film gets! Drama 1962 NR 130 minutes B & W.

SEE ALSO:

Scottsboro: An American Tragedy

The Murder of Emmett Till

Freedom Riders

The Help

Hoop Dreams

<color:#ffffff;color:#000000″>

Custom Search

</color:#ffffff;color:#000000″>

Must-See Movies—For What You Need to Know

TELL YOUR FRIENDS!

In To Kill a Mockingbird lawyer Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck, in an Oscar-winning role) defends an innocent black man against rape charges but ends up in a maelstrom of hate and prejudice. Meanwhile, with help from a friend, Finch’s children, Jem and Scout (Mary Badham), set their sights on making contact with a reclusive neighbor (Robert Duvall). It is a compelling, heartfelt, sentimental (but not saccharine) story of a country lawyer and father in the Depression Era 1930s, who is assigned by the county judge to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. The unique accomplishment of this movie is the focus on the children. It is a story about children making sense of their world, and about a father’s love and guidance. There are additional little nuggets of gold: the film includes the debut of one of our greatest actors, Robert Duvall as Boo — and Dill is based on a young Truman Capote who actually was a childhood friend of the author of this novel. Has there ever been a more effective scene than when at the end of the trial the Black minister turns to Scout and says “Miss Jean Louise, stand up, your father is passing”? Or a better ending? Or a better object lesson about race and class? I don’t think so. The Atticus character could be a national role model. Gregory Peck was nominated for Oscars five times, but this was the only time he took one home. Southern comforts abound in this big-screen adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. Atticus Finch: “He said I could shoot all the blue jays I wanted, if I could hit ’em, but to remember it was a sin to kill a mockingbird…I reckon because mockingbirds don’t do anything but sing for our enjoyment. They don’t eat people’s gardens, don’t nest in the corncribs. They don’t do one thing but just sing their hearts out for us.” What more can be said about this classic? A great novel turned into an even greater film! How often does that happen? Perhaps the best movie adaptation of a novel of all time. It is no wonder why this book continues to be required reading for so many high school kids. It should be required reading for people of all ages. It is entertaining, thought-provoking and is guaranteed to move you. I have never met a person who did not love this film. I’ve never been more affected by a film emotionally than by To Kill a Mockingbird. After 40 years the film has lost none of its power. A rare film that can be viewed over and over with satisfaction. This is a great story that will leave you deep in thought and contemplating your relationships and attitudes about family, community, honesty, violence and race. Sometimes we need to find a “fresh” movie and that can include one that was made years ago. Sometimes we are blown away by a vintage movie that we have never seen or saw only once a long time ago. To Kill a Mockingbird is that movie for me. This beloved film is consistently ranked near the top and ranked #25 among all films by the American Film Institute. As close to perfection as a film gets! Drama 1962 NR 130 minutes B & W.

SEE ALSO:

Scottsboro: An American Tragedy

The Murder of Emmett Till

Freedom Riders

The Help

Hoop Dreams

<color:#ffffff;color:#000000″>

Custom Search

</color:#ffffff;color:#000000″>

Must-See Movies—For What You Need to Know

TELL YOUR FRIENDS!